Pit Bull Informational Pages
by Diane Jessup 

HOW TO HEAT A DOG HOUSE

THIS PAGE IS UNDERCONSTRUCTION

QUICK, EASY STEPS TO HEATING A DOG HOUSE

Absolutely no one is as challenged as me when it comes to building something. No one! So if I can do this - you can do it! Trust me!

This is a quick, easy and very inexpensive way to turn your dog's house into a luxury heated home.

Here are two options:

  • using a kit
  • doing it with things you find at any hardware store.

K9 KONDO Kit

K9 Kondo made a heater (see photo above) but they now make a floor mat. The above heater is wonderful, but they no longer make it, and it did not work well in their really small dog houses (which is why they probably don't make it any longer). I have not purchased the floor mat yet (but will be) so I will give here the link to their instructions on how to purchase and install the floor mat. It looks quite easy. I'll let you know!

Please be aware that while the K9 Kondo Dog Den 2 is a nice dog house, it is VERY small, and also the door jams if anything gets in the way. I will not be buying another one due to these two reasons.

CLICK HERE FOR LINK

Here is a LINK to several other dog heaters
you can use in your own dog houses.


Do It Yourself Method # 1

Here is how I installed the old (no longer available) K9 Kondo heater. The parts are readily available at any hardware and pet store; you can rig this kind of heater up with local parts.

STEP 1: Purchase:

  • one ceramic light bulb base
  • one reptile heater (from PetCo) small watt for small dog houses, larger watt for larger dog houses.
  • an extension cord long enough to reach from the dog house to a power source
  • depending on your dog, metal pipe or plastic pipe to cover the extension cord

Here are some of the parts you will need:

STEP 2: With a drill, punch a hole through the back or side of the dog house which the wire will fit through. Don't make it any larger than it needs to be. Don't place the heater where the dog will run into entering the dog house. Don't place it up against a wall, either. See good location in picture at top of page.


STEP 3: If you are using an extension cord, cut off the end and strip the wires, like this:

STEP 4: Stick the wire/extension cord through the hole and attach the wires to the back of the ceramic light bulb holder. If you are unsure of which color goes to what, ask someone for help. You don't want to mess up and burn your dog's house down!

STEP 5: Screw the ceramic light bulb holder to the dog house. Make sure it is screwed in securely.

STEP 6: Screw in the ceramic heater. In a dog house, you can use a light bulb (red is best) in mild climates, or a heat lamp in really cold climates IF the dog house is large enough the dog won't be burned by the light.

STEP 7: Make a baffle which will keep the dog from coming into contact with the heating element. This is the baffle that came in the kit. You can make one out of wire.

STEP 8: Fill dog house with chips or straw, but make SURE it can't get piled up in the corners high enough to catch fire. Chips are safer than straw. The picture below shows a metal "baffle" I placed over the top of the heater to keep the roof from getting too hot. Probably not necessary, I'm just a freak about these things.

STEP 9: Use metal or plastic (you know your dog!) to protect the power cord coming out of the dog house. Make sure water will not get into and sit in the tube. I drill holes in the bottom of the pipe so water can drain out.

STEP 10: Secure extension cord and make sure it is handy so you can plug and unplug the cord as needed. They DO make thermostats - but I don't trust them. If it is going to be above 40 degrees, I unplug all dog houses. On really cold, clear, spring mornings, just unplug when you get up - the house will stay warm until the sun comes out.

STEP 11: THIS IS IMPORTANT - Make SURE your dog is "OK" with the heater. Some dogs may be frightened of the new, strange element and even spooked by the heat emanating from it. My suggestion is to let the dog sleep in the house a few nights BEFORE you turn it on. Turn it on for the first time when you can monitor the dog and make sure they can go in it.

STEP 12: Pat yourself on the back! You just took the time and energy to make your dog's house as comfortable as yours!

Do It Yourself Method # 2

Here is how I can make any dog house heated. This works well with "igloo" style dog houses. It really is simple.

STEP 1: Purchase:

  • one ceramic light bulb base
  • one reptile heater (from PetCo) small watt for small dog houses, larger watt for larger dog houses.
  • an extension cord long enough to reach from the dog house to a power source
  • depending on your dog, metal pipe or plastic pipe to cover the extension cord

STEP 2: With a drill, punch a hole through the top of the dog house which the wire will fit through. Don't make it any larger than it needs to be. Don't place the heater where the dog will run into entering the dog house. Don't place it up against a wall, either. See good location in picture at top of page.

STEP 3: If you are using an extension cord, cut off the end and strip the wires, like this:

STEP 4: Stick the wire/extension cord through the hole and attach the wires to the back of the ceramic light bulb holder. If you are unsure of which color goes to what, ask someone for help. You don't want to mess up and burn your dog's house down!

STEP 5: Screw the ceramic light bulb holder to the dog house. Make sure it is screwed in securely.

STEP 6: Screw in the ceramic heater. In a dog house, you can use a light bulb (red is best) in mild climates, or a heat lamp in really cold climates IF the dog house is large enough the dog won't be burned by the light.

STEP 7: Make a baffle which will keep the dog from coming into contact with the heating element.

STEP 8: Fill dog house with chips or straw, but make SURE it can't get piled up in the corners high enough to catch fire. Chips are safer than straw.

STEP 9: Use metal or plastic (you know your dog!) to protect the power cord coming out of the dog house. Make sure water will not get into and sit in the tube. I drill holes in the bottom of the pipe so water can drain out.

STEP 10: Secure extension cord and make sure it is handy so you can plug and unplug the cord as needed. They DO make thermostats - but I don't trust them. If it is going to be above 40 degrees, I unplug all dog houses. On really cold, clear, spring mornings, just unplug when you get up - the house will stay warm until the sun comes out.

STEP 11: THIS IS IMPORTANT - Make SURE your dog is "OK" with the heater. Some dogs may be frightened of the new, strange element and even spooked by the heat emanating from it. My suggestion is to let the dog sleep in the house a few nights BEFORE you turn it on. Turn it on for the first time when you can monitor the dog and make sure they can go in it.

STEP 12: Pat yourself on the back! You just took the time and energy to make your dog's house as comfortable as yours!

HEATER FOR IGLOO STYLE DOG HOUSES

Those plastic igloo style dog houses leave a lot to be desired. But sometimes they are all you can get. The door is too large, they don't insulate the dog for anything, they channel rain in, well, the list goes on. Here is one way to make your igloo style dog house half way decent. These half circle heaters can help keep the dog house half way warm. I have not used one.

CLICK HERE FOR LINK

 

  © copyright Diane Jessup ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
No images or content on this web site may be copied, reproduced,
displayed or used in any form or manner without written consent of the owner.